Should you exercise on an empty stomach?

Health Research
Oct 03, 2016
Health Research

Should you eat before exercise, or wait ‘til after? It’s a question that has divided fitness fans for years. But new research suggests you might be better working out before breakfast.
 
Here’s why:
 

A study in the British Journal of Nutrition showed that men who eat breakfast after running ended up burning 20 percent more fat than guys who ate before pounding the pavement.
 
Or in science speak: “Energy and fat balance is further reduced with breakfast omission. Breakfast improved the overall appetite responses to foods consumed later in the day, but abrogated the appetite-suppressive effect of exercise.”
 
The need for protein
 
That being said, some exercise experts have warned that there is a risk of protein loss. And that’s because when your body can’t draw on glycogen for its energy, it may start breaking down protein instead. Given that protein is the building block of muscle, it’s something no one with a focus on fitness wants to experience.
 
How to combat that?
 
After exercise, ensure you have a high-protein breakfast. Such as a protein shake, or an animal protein like eggs (assuming you’re not on a vegan diet). This will ensure your energy levels and protein stores are restored after a workout.
 
But, as with everything, when and what and how you eat is up to you. Maybe you feel better eating after exercise. Either way if you’re unsure, chat with a dietician, nutritionist, or personal trainer for their expert insights and guidance.

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People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills… There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind… So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself. — MARCUS AURELIUS