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Member since 2010

Wellspring Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine Clinic

Dr. Kevin Cao

50 Kensington Rd
Rose Park SA 5067

Servicing area: Rose Park, South Australia

Wellspring Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine Clinic

Find your wellbeing in Wellspring;
Feel the Power of Traditional Chinese Healing Art…

Wellspring Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine Clinic


Welcome to Wellspring Acupuncture & Chinese Medicine Clinic

  • Acupuncture

  • Moxibustion

  • Chinese Herbal Medicine

  • Cupping

    Tortured by severe pain? Even went to emergency room?

    According to a clinical research in 2017, 1964 patients presenting to emergency departments in one of four tertiary hospitals in Melbourne with acute low back pain, migraine, or ankle sprain. They were randomised to acupuncture alone, acupuncture plus pharmacotherapy or pharmacotherapy alone. The outcome shows the effectiveness of acupuncture in providing acute analgesia was comparable with that of pharmacotherapy. Acupuncture is an acceptable form of analgesia.

    How does acupuncture work?

    Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine are part of Traditional Chinese medicine(TCM). Through at least 2000 years acupuncturists have successfully treated billions—literally billions—of Chinese people, including mighty Chinese emperors, for a wide variety of symptoms, conditions, injuries, and diseases. Today, these therapies are used throughout Asia, Europe, and North America. They are also becoming popular with Australians. They provide alternative solutions to individuals who prefer natural cures as a way of living.

    The theory behind acupuncture's ability to treat pain and disease is based on an energetic model of the human body. Vital energy, or Qi flows through the body on specific pathways called meridians. Each pathway is associated with an internal organ. Pain or disease occurs in the body when there is a deficiency or an imbalance of the energy in the meridians. Acupuncture points are specific locations along the meridians. The insertion of a very fine needle at a given point has a very predictable effect on the energy that passes through that point, restoring balance in the meridian. Modern research has shown that acupuncture may increase circulation, reduce inflammation and trigger the release of endorphins – the body's own "feel-good" pain-relieving chemicals..

    Acupuncture needles are solid and hair-thin. They are sterile, single-use and disposable. Therefore, there is no risk of contamination between patients.

    Moxibustion & cupping are often used to compliment the acupuncture treatment. Moxibustion involves the burning of a Chinese herb to heat the acupuncture needle and/or the acu-point. Cupping is the application of suction cups to the skin in order to suck out toxins and accumulated stress and tensions.



    Chinese Herbal Medicine

    Chinese herbal medicine involves the use of substances from nature to regulate and normalise bodily functions. Herbs play a significant role in Chinese medicine. Most Chinese herbs are of plant origin (leaves, seeds, twigs, stems, roots flowers and fruits). Here, we dispense our herbal formulas in small pills or powdered granule form, that ensure your convenience.




    Your Practioner--Dr. Kevin Cao

    * Acupuncturist & Chinese herbalist registered by Chinese Medicine Board of Australia. Accredited by AACMA (Australian Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine Association, the leading national professional association of acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners)

    * Master’s Degree in Gynecology of TCM

    * Doctor’s Degree in Rheumatology of Western Medicine (China Medical University)

    * 20 years of clinical experience

    * He has a particular interest in working with patients with  Severe Pain, Mental Stress, Menstural/Menopausal issues & Fertility issues

    For example: Headache  
    Neck and Shoulder Pain
    Back Pain
    Knee and Ankle Pain
    Arm and Wrist Pain
    Feet and Heel Pain

    * Lecturing in Endeavour College of Natural Health since 2009 for the students studying for Bachelor's Degree in Acupuncture. His profound knowledge and exquisite skill has made him one of the most popular lecturer on Adelaide campus.

    * Qualified for Health Fund Rebates.



    He has been always focusing on how to improve the effective treatment of stubborn diseases. He utilizes his profound knowledge of Western Medicine to appreciate the value of TCM better.

    He has never treated his patients just as a collection of symptoms and signs. He insists that the soul of TCM is differentiating the mechanisms beneath numerous and complicated symptoms. So he spares no efforts in finding the nuance of each case and providing direct treatment for the root of the imbalance. Each patient is treated with an individual approach, which he believes is the best opportunity for recovery.



    How's your nose going today? Seasonal tips for hayfever(allergic rhinitis)sufferers.

    Warm spring spells bad news for hayfever sufferers. It means flower buds and blooming trees. The allergy season is arriving earlier and earlier in the wake of global warming. Many trees and grasses are flowering sooner and for longer, creating more of the pollen which is the main trigger of hayfever. When people with hay fever are exposed to particular pollens, their body mistakenly thinks this is a threat and triggers an allergic reaction. Inflammatory cells quickly release mediators such as histamine and that’s when the symptoms kick in. Three million Australian adults – 15% of the population – struggle through spring and summer with watery eyes, running nose, itchy throat and the hallmark hay fever symptom, sneezing. If you're one of the millions of people who have seasonal allergies(also called hay fever and allergic rhinitis), it can make you miserable.

    Common hay fever symptoms include:

  • Sneezing

  • Watery eyes

  • Itchy throat

  • Itchy nose

  • Blocked/runny nose

    Severe hay fever symptoms may include:

  • Headaches

  • Loss of smell and taste

  • Sweats

  • Facial pain caused by blocked sinuses

  • Itchiness spreads from the throat, to the nose and ears

  • Tiredness (fatigue)

  • Irritability

  • Insomnia

    Antihistamine and steroid are the most often used medicines for hayfever, but what if they don't work well or you really concern the side effects?

    How Could Acupuncture Help hayfever?

    Acupuncture may reduce sneezing, runny noses and itchiness of hay fever, Victorian trial finds

    Researchers from RMIT and Monash universities conducted a trial to assess the effectiveness and safety of four weeks of acupuncture.

    Patients were given 12 sessions of either a sham acupuncture treatment or the real version in the height of the hay fever season every year for a three-year period.
    At the end of the four-week treatment they found symptoms of sneezing and itchiness of the ears were “significantly less severe” in the patients who received the real acupuncture.
    It was also more effective in treating runny and itchy noses.
    Patients who received acupuncture reported a boost in their quality of life.
    One of the paper’s authors, Professor Frank Thien, head of the Respiratory and Sleep Medicine Clinical Research Unit at Monash University, said it was thought that acupuncture induced an anti-inflammatory response in the body.

    The study, published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, suggests that the long-lasting effects could prove useful if acupuncture was used a few weeks before the onset of the peak hay fever season to prevent unbearable symptoms.

    So if you would like to enjoy the spring rather than hate it, you have another option now.



    References

    Marc M Cohen, De Villiers Smit, Nick Andrianopoulos, Michael Ben-Meir, David McD Taylor, Shefton J Parker, Chalie C Xue, Peter A Cameron. Acupuncture for analgesia in the emergency department: a multicentre, randomised, equivalence and non-inferiority trial. The Medical Journal of Australia, 2017; 206 (11): 494


    Charlie Changli Xue, Anthony Lin Zhang, Claire Shuiqing Zhang, Cliff DaCosta, David F. Story, Frank C. Thien. Acupuncture for seasonal allergic rhinitis: a randomised controlled trial. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol; available online 11 June 2015.

Qualification Details


  • National Registered acupuncturist & Chinese herbalist

  • AACMA accredited acupuncturist & Chinese herbalist
  • Masterís Degree in Gynecology of TCM
  • Doctorís Degree in Rheumatology of Western Medicine (China Medical University)
  • Location


    Service Categories

    2018